Fukushima plutonium measured in Lithuania

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Is it 600 pounds of Pu that they estimate was aerosolized at Fukushima?

How many miles is it from Fukushima to Lithuania?

Approximately 5,000 miles.

So Pu was found 5,000 miles away from its source, after travelling across two oceans and approximately 1.5 Continents.

How many people were exposed to larger amounts as the original amount travelled and dropped off?

And what amount is dangerous upon inhalation?

A very tiny amount is, so I've read.

How long before the lung cancers begin showing up?

Abstract exerpt

"The activity ratio of 134Cs/137Cs was around 1 with small variations only. The activity ratio of 238Pu/239,240Pu in the aerosol sample was 1.2, indicating a presence of the spent fuel of different origin than that of the Chernobyl accident."
http://www.happysmile.se/dokument/science_plutonium_litauen.pdf

Weapons fallout?

If the Plutonium is not from Chernobyl doesn't mean it came from Fukushima.

Due to atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in the '50s; the USA and the Soviet Union put about 10 metric tonnes, or 10,000 kilograms of Plutonium into the atmosphere.

Brief

In a meltdown nuclear fuel is vaporized at high temperatures releasing many radioactive aerosols .they are then transported via atmospheric trends,wind patterns ,loft, ect. Thanks for posting this document Tdm...

right, to clarify, this study

right, to clarify, this study just brings up some questions, such as why would they have been the only group outside of japan to have detected Pu? if there were detectable levels there then it seems like somebody should have found levels in the US. The EPA did detect levels on the west coast and Hawaii that were attributed to Fukushima, correct? lots of papers have been put out in the last two months on this from global research teams and this in the only one that mentions any radionuclide besides I 131 and Cs 134/137.

AR

Scary stuff

I saw this a month or so ago. A few key thoughts-

1) EPA's results were actually non-detects due to not having a 95% confidence of detection. Mark commented on this at length a while back. That having been said, see #2.

2) I personally am of the opinion that the EPA did a half ass job at best. It is easy to not see something - just don't look. Or don't test properly. In the case of looking for traces of radioactive materials, one can easily manipulate the results by keeping the MDA high enough (use a short count time) and "see no evil/hear no evil".

If a guy in Lithuania could see it (and assuming it came from Fukushima, which I'd put a hunskie on), it darned sure went over the US.

3) On the flip side, there have been many detections of U and Pu previously. Wind knows no bounds. Any given day in your life you may have that chance to suck in some of this stuff, but doubtless the odds were better in March/April.

Check out the abstract on this paper - http://www.mendeley.com/research/plutonium-air-kurchatov-kazakhstan/. Note that the dose from this crap inhaled downwind of Russia's test site is estimated to be about a 1000 times less than the natural Po-210 dose. Po-210 is some bad stuff, maybe worse than Pu.

4) BRAWM did set limits for detection for some of the heavy metal stuff and didn't see any, but their equip is not really optimal for this type of thing. I'm glad they did this test though - at least it tells us that any levels seen were mighty low.

BC 3/1/12

yeah thanks, that putting it

yeah thanks, that putting it in perspective stuff is good. one thing that I noticed when searching through the EPA radnet data for plutonium is that it's been detected all around my region (east coast) many times since '78. but, curiously, not any has been detected at all since '09. So I don't know what to make of that, other than that I'm suspicious that the EPA just decided to stop the plutonium tests that year. but, assuming no high-level conspiracy, it probably just means I was already likely to have been dosed pre-Fukushima.

AR
3/1/12

yeah thanks, that putting it

yeah thanks, that putting it in perspective stuff is good. one thing that I noticed when searching through the EPA radnet data for plutonium is that it's been detected all around my region (east coast) many times since '78. but, curiously, not any has been detected at all since '09. So I don't know what to make of that, other than that I'm suspicious that the EPA just decided to stop the plutonium tests that year. but, assuming no high-level conspiracy, it probably just means I was already likely to have been dosed pre-Fukushima.

AR
3/1/12